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20111001
20111031
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2011 8:00am EDT
perspectives on the issue of lightsquared, and now joining us is representative paul brown. he is the chairman of the science and technology committee. congressman brown, you recently held a hearing around lightsquared. >> guest: we did. >> host: what was that hearing about, and what did you learn? >> guest: well, peter, we have been trying to get information from lightsquared because the information we've been able to ascertain thus far is this ground-based broadband network that lightsquared wants to put in place is being fast tracked through the fcc, and this administration is pushing the fcc to approve light square lightsquared's spectrum. everything that we hear from all the experts is that this spectrum, if it's ground-based -- which it wasn't designed to be -- is going to interfere with everybody's gps in their cars, it's going to interfere, also, with the high, the highly technical gpss that science community utilizes, that the aviation community uses, that particularly the military uses. so the high precision gps very probably is going to be interfered with by lightsquared's
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2011 8:00am EDT
also with us, she's a senior reporter with the washington business journal. >> host: thank you for joining us. >> guest: thank you. >> host: one thing i noticed in the report is that you said that the number of security incidents that agencies report has increased 650%. um, that's a huge number. i know a lot of times that's explained by better detection, ask i know there's also quite a lot of security incidents that go unnoticed. so how should we look at that number? is it as scary as it appears to be? >> guest: well, clearly, it's a dramatic increase in the number of security incidents from fiscal year 2006 through 2010 the number increased from 5500 to over 41,000 security incidents, as you say, a 650% increase. 30% of those in fiscal year 10 dealt with malicious software and the installation of malicious code on federal systems and networks. and so this is quite a significant issue, and it can be both due to better reporting and detection, but also, as alluded to to peter's opening comments, to an increase in activity in cyber events on federal systems. but you're absolutely rig
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2011 8:00pm EDT
is not finalized. >> we have to do it right, so it wouldn't do us very good in the long run to end up with an incomplete model where we know where things were going on first. second what i'm concerned is whether or not the different agencies and departments in fact have included this notion of security as they go forward. it's no excuse that program is not available. the independent responsibility as far as running their agencies and departments since the move into a cloud or series of clouds and secure clouds and public clouds that they do it in the right fashion and in the third thing i would say is this. there are different levels of data that would require different levels of security concerns and security applications and getting that right is extremely important from the very get go. a huge mistake to the kind of data identifying it identified in misapply the security that needs to go to it a huge mess we have to dig our way out. it is government and i get frustrated at times my dad was one of those people in world war ii the beaches of normandy and several days after d-day t
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2011 6:30pm EDT
contractors systems and efforts needs improvement. host: what percentage of federal agencies use contractors and what percentage are contractors in charge of the special information? guest: percentage of the 24 agencies, every agency uses contractors for their i.t. operations. omb issued a report on its fism a implementation last year, early this year, and it identified that about 1100 of the 13,000 systems operated by federal government were operated by contractors. in addition, of the i.t. personnel that were involved in information security operations, in which there were 80,000 fte's, over half of those were contractor personnel. so it is a large number of contractor personnel that have access. host: just a follow-up on that line of questioning, does that lead to further security concerns? what about the issue of cloud computing? guest: certainly with the use of contractors, agencies need to understand and be aware of the controls they have in place to oversee the actions of those contractors to make sure that they adequately protect information systems and their information.
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2011 6:30pm EDT
back and walk you through the history of lightsquared and a spectrum we're using today. the spectrum was allocated in 1989. that is a time when there was no option. companies were going in getting the spectrum as they needed it. a lot of the current wireless large operators came into existence at the time. this spectrum was originally allocated for satellite purposes. in early 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, under republican and ministrations -- administrations, getting permission to build a terrestrial network, working in conjunction with the satellite network. gps manufacturers participated in the process and supported the process. we made comments on our network design. we talked about how we live as good neighbors, because gps spectrum is next door to the lightsquared spectrum. we defined rules that lightsquared will not transmitted to the dps spectrum. that required us to make -- the gps spectrum. that requires us to make a big wall on our site. in 2010, when you're asking for a change of control, when we required the predecessor company to lightsquared, called skyterra, the fcc mandate
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2011 8:00am EDT
comprehensive network, using fourth generation technology built to date your but complemented with a satellite we launched last year it is the largest commercial satellite ever. so whether you're in yellowstone national park, grand canyon, or appalachian trail, you're connected. >> host: are you operational right now? >> guest: cannot get to our satellite is operational. we're in the process of moving customers over to the satellite. >> host: who are your customers? >> guest: our customers are retailers. we don't go directly to the consumer. we go to of the company's that take our service and offered to consumers. to date, we have signed 17 customers. so think of it from a consumer perspective. these 17 companies when we are operational and can offer nationwide wireless conductivity to american consumers. so today when you look for a nationwide service, and you have three, maybe four choices. we have enabled 17 companies to get into that business. part of those are national carriers today. sprint, for instance, tournament is a customer? >> guest: is a customer. also others. but 15 of
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2011 8:00pm EDT
network that's going to be the most comprehensive network using 4th generation technology built to-date, but complement to the satellite we launched last year, it's the largest commercial satellite ever. whether it's the grand canyon or appalachian trail, you're connected. >> host: are you operational now? >> guest: no, we are not operationer. our satellite is operationer. our trees yal network is not operational. >> host: who are your customers? >> guest: our customers are host retailers. we don't go to the consumer. we go to other companies that take our service and offer it to the consumers. to date, we have signed 17 customers, so think of it from a consumers' perspective, these 17 companies, when we are operational can offer broadband wireless connectivity to american consumers, so today when you look for a nationwide service, you have three or maybe four choices. we have enabled 17 companies to get into that buzz. now, part of those are national carriers today. spryness for -- sprint, for example, they are a customer. fifteen other companies, we've made them, enabled them to be na
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2011 6:30pm EDT
causes us concern about this is if we look at it in the context of the international arena, we have in europe carriers in europe calling for rules on i.p. interconnection that would allow for them to charge for the delivery of traffic into their countries. the developed world has wanted to establish a system that was similar to what we had in the old voice world, a system of charges for physical delivery to the developed world because they want to collect this money to build the infrastructure. this is something which puts, in essence, old world regulation into the new world. and allows countries to prevent the free flow of information into those countries. and it is really targeted at our internet companies in the u.s. we provide the content, they provide the search. we have the amazon, we have netflix. we are the ones sending traffic. at that want to charge us. it is in part to collect money from u.s. companies. when you look at it in that context, we have to be careful about what we do domestically and setting up a regime for government regime for interconnection rather than allowin
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2011 8:00am EDT
us this week on "the communicators." >> host: thank you. and the hearing was focused on, like you said, the security of cloud computing and the federal government moving etc. moving its systems toward the cloud. and at that hearing you described the administration beneficials who touted the benefits of the cloud as glass half full people. and then there was a gao official who was a little bit more skeptical of cloud computing and its security, and you driebd him as a glass half empty person. >> guest: right. >> host: so the hearing's done, and you've heard what people have to say, so are you a glass half empty or half full guy? [laughter] >> guest: well, i think i have to pick up both glasses at this point in time, and the reason for that is that we shouldn't, we shouldn't shy away are from or somehow be afraid of cloud computing. it is a part of the advanced development of the computer world as explained to me by people that are far more technically advanced than i am. at the same time, some would say, well, look, this gives us a better opportunity to secure our data, and you wou
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2011 6:30pm EDT
technology reporter. she joins us this week. guest: the hearing was focused on the, like his said, the security of cloud computing, and the federal government moving its system towards the cloud. at that hearing you described administration officials touting the benefits of the cloud as glass half full people. and then there was a gao official who was a little bit more skeptical of cloud computing and its security. and you described him as the glass half empty person. so the hearing is done and you have heard what folks have to say. so are you a glass half empty guy or a glass half full by when it comes to security? guest: you may recall at the hearing i ask, which glass to have to pick up? i have to pick up both glasses. the reason for that is that we should not shy away from or somehow be afraid of cloud computing. it is a part of the advanced development of the computer world, as explained to me by people that are far more technically advanced than i am. at the same time, some would say, look, this gives us a greater opportunity to share our data. well, if you got a cloud that conta
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2011 6:30pm EDT
issue of lightsquared. now joining us is representative paul broun. he is chairman of the science- space technology subcommittee. you recently held a hearing around lightsquared. what was that hearing about and what did you learn? guest: we have been trying to get information from lightsquared, because the information we have been able to ascertain thus far is that this ground-based broadband network that lightsquared wants to put in place is being fast track through the fcc. and this administration is pushing the fcc to approve ishtsquared's spectrum which adjacent to the gps spectrum. everything that we hear from all lightsquared is that this spectrum, if it is ground-based, is going to interfere with everybody's gps in their cars and interfere with the highly that the gpeseses science and the military community uses. so the high precision gps is probably going to be interviewed byk b-- interfered with lightsquared going ahead. the spectrum was designed for low intensity. it was designed to be a signal broadcast from satellites. but lightsquared is trying to push it through, and
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2011 8:00pm EDT
is a senior reporter with the "washington business journal." >> guest: thank you for joining us. one thing i noticed in the report is that he said that the number of security incidents that agencies report have increased to 650%. that is a huge number. i know a lot of time -- better detection and there's also a lot that goes unnoticed. how should we look at that number? is it as scary as it appears to be? >> guest: clearly it is a dramatic increase in the number of security incidents. from fiscal year 2,632,010 the number increased from 5500 to over 41,000 security incidents. as you say, a 650% increase. 30% of those in fiscal year 10 dealt with malicious software and the installation of the code on federal systems and networks. so this is quite a significant issue and it can be both due to better reporting and detection but also as alluded to in peter's opening comments to an increase in activity in cyberevents on federal systems. that you are absolutely right. whether that is the actual number, where there is there are a number of incidents that are recurring that remain undetected
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2011 8:00am EDT
we had -- the thing that causes us concern about this is if we look at it in the context of the international arena, we have in europe the carriers in europe calling for rules on ip interconnection that would allow them to charge for the delivery of traffic to their, to their countries, into their countries. the developed world has wanted to establish a system that was similar to what we had in the old voice world, a system of charges for delivery of traffic to the developed world because they want to collect this money in order to build up their infrastructure. this is something which puts, in essence, old world regulation into the new world, and it allows countries to prevent the free flow of information into those countries. and, of course, it's really targeted at our internet companies in the u.s. they say we're, our u.s. companies provide the content, we provide the search, we have the amazons, we have the netflixs, so we are the ones who are sending traffic, and they want to charge us. and in part it's to, in a sense, collect money from u.s. companies. so i think that when
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)